GUI Annual Conference 2012

Growing Up in Ireland Annual Conference 2012

The 4th Annual Growing Up in Ireland Research Conference 2012 took place on Thursday 29th November 2012 at the Ballsbridge Hotel, Pembroke Road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4.

The latest Key Findings from the Child Cohort at 13 years were launched at the conference, to view these Key Findings please click here.

The opening presentation, Thirteen-year-olds and their families – preliminary results from the second wave of the Child Cohort was presented by Prof. James Williams, Principal Investigator of Growing Up in Ireland and can be downloaded by clicking here.

To download a copy of the conference brochure please click here.

A Book of Abstracts is available here.

Speakers and Presentations

The Keynote speaker was Professor Lucinda Platt, Director of the Millennium Cohort Study and Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Education, University of London

The keynote address The Importance of Longitudinal Studies for Policy and Practice is available to download by clicking here.

A total of 21 papers were presented at the conference by researchers from a wide range of third level and research institutions. These were based on data from Growing Up in Ireland’s Child and Infant Cohorts and focused on a range of topics including health, parenting, education and childcare

Presentations from the conference can be downloaded below.

Session A

Social class of Irish speaking families and children’s behaviours (click here to view)

Ursula Ni Choill, Tom O’ Dowd and Udo Reulbach

Does a healthy immigrant effct exist among Irish-born children? (click here to view)

Emma Ladewig, Tom O’ Dowd and Udo Reulbach

Session C

Growing Up Online: Patterns of ICT use among the nine year old cohort (click here to view)

Brian O’ Neill and Thuy Dinh

Spending time with family and friends: Children’s views of relationships and shared activities (click here to view)

Colette Mc Auley, Caroline McKeown and Brian Merriman

Session D

Gender differences in risk and protective factors for academic achievement (click here to view)

Maeve Thornton

Self-fulfilling prophecy? Academic expectations among teachers and parents of children with special educational needs. (click here to view)

Joanne Banks, Delma Byrne and Selina McCoy

Behaviour policy in primary schools (click here to view)

Amanda Quail and Emer Smyth

Session E

Patterns in family structures among 9-year-olds (click here to view)

Anne-Marie Brooks

Comparison of stepmother and stepfather families in Ireland (click here to view)

Kristin Hadfield and Elizabeth Nixon

Multi-dimensional poverty among 9-year-olds (click here to view)

James Williams, Aisling Murray and Christopher T. Whelan

Session F

A socio-economic profile of childhood disability in Ireland: evidence from the Growing Up in Ireland survey (click here to view)

Aine Roddy and John Cullinan

Child injuries in Ireland: Risk factors related to family, school, neighbourhood and the child (click here to view)

Ela Polek

Session G

The association between adverse life events and socio-emotional outcomes (click here to view)

Mark Morgan and James Williams

The prevalence of speech and language impairment among a nationally representative sample of Irish 9-year-olds (click here to view)

Zoe Rooke

The effect of user fees on the utilisation of GP services by children in Ireland (click here to view)

Anne Nolan and Richard Layte

Session H

Measured parental weight status and familal socio-economic status correlates with childhood overweight and obesity at age 9 (click here to view)

Eimear Keane, Janas Harrington, Patricia Kearney, Ivan Perry and Richard Layte

Psycho-social implications of overweight and obesity among nine year old children (click here to view)

Mark Ward, Evelyn Mahon and Richard Layte

The relationship between sedentary behaviour and overweight/obesity in nine year old children (click here to view)

Dervla Kelly, Tom O’ Dowd and Udo Reulbach

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