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Pete Lunn

Pete Lunn

Senior Research Officer

pete.lunn@esri.ie

Dr. Pete Lunn is an economist, author and former BBC journalist who joined the ESRI in 2006. Originally trained as a neuroscientist, his primary research interest is economic decision-making. He has a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and an M.Sc. in Economics, both from the University of London.

Pete is the Principal Investigator of PRICE (Programme of Research Investigating Consumer Evaluation) Lab. Beginning in January 2013, PRICE Lab is developing original experiments designed to test the abilities of consumers to choose between complex products. PRICE Lab is supported by the Central Bank of Ireland, National Consumer Agency, the Commission for Energy Regulation and the Communications Regulator (ComReg).

Pete’s most recent Working Papers centre on the implications for public policy of what is now known about how people make economic decisions. The issues explored include the regulation of various consumer markets, what might be learned from Ireland’s banking crisis, and how government might best make use of advances in behavioural economics. He has also provided new evidence of what causes the endowment effect and proposed an original theory to explain why consumers perceived an illusory jump in inflation when Euro notes and coins were introduced.

Pete is the author of a book on behavioural economics for general readers, entitled “Basic Instincts: Human Nature and the New Economics”, published by Marshall Cavendish. The book introduces readers to the classic results of behavioural economics and argues that the findings are leading to profound changes in our understanding of the economy.

Pete has also published research on equality and discrimination in the Irish labour market (funded by the Equality Authority), changing patterns of family formation and fertility (sponsored by the Family Support Agency), and participation in sport and physical activity (supported by the Irish Sports Council). His work on sport includes a statistical reconstruction of the recent history of participation of grassroots Irish sport (here).


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