Cherishing all the children equally?

October 12, 2016 9:15AM - 12:30PM

Note: The presentations from this event are now available to download here.

CHERISHING ALL THE CHILDREN EQUALLY?

Ireland 100 years on from the Easter Rising

Edited by James Williams, Elizabeth Nixon, Emer Smyth and Dorothy Watson

Wednesday 12th October, 2016 (09:15 – 12:30)

The Economic and Social Research Institute, Whitaker Square, Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Dublin 2

                                                                                                                                      

In 1916, the Proclamation of the Irish Republic resolved to “…cherish all of the children of the nation equally…”. One hundred years on, children and young people in Ireland continue to have diverse childhood experiences and outcomes, prompting many to ask if the aspirations of the signatories have been realised in modern Ireland.

On 12th October, the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) and Trinity College (TCD) will release a book which draws on 10 years of groundbreaking research findings from the Growing Up in Ireland study to assess if, 100 years on from the Easter Rising, children in Ireland have equal chances of a bright future. CHERISHING ALL THE CHILDREN EQUALLY? brings together multidisciplinary expertise to shed light on how child development is influenced by a variety of family, socio-emotional and demographic factors.

Following the official launch of the book by Dr. Katherine Zappone, T.D., Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, its editors will present on themes which are central to childhood (such as education, family and health) and discuss how the key findings can help policymakers and practitioners to navigate a social landscape which has changed so completely since 1916.

The launch of this seminal book coincides with the 10th anniversary of the government-funded Growing Up in Ireland project.  Growing Up in Ireland provides an invaluable data source which the authors have drawn on to enhance our understanding of childhood and child development.  Such an understanding is critical in creating a society in which the children of 21st Century Ireland can flourish and prosper – an Ireland where all of the children are, in fact, cherished equally.

Join us for a conversation on how a decade of new thinking on childhood can respond to a century of change.

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